APS Values

Science Fair

On Tuesday 26th of June, APS main hall was completely taken over by 59 amazing science projects from our local primary schools. The Science Fair day offered KS2 pupils with the best projects the opportunity to see others' projects, explain their work to the judges, complete a lab sessions at APS, see a science show and have a chance of winning an award and prize!

The quality of the projects was incredible, with topics like ‘why can’t you land on Jupiter’, ‘how much sugar are we drinking’, ‘global pollution’, ‘robotics’, ‘slime’, ‘how does sight and smell effect taste’ and 53 more! The students from Y3-Y6 explained their projects amazingly often with excellent practical demonstrations. Over the course of the day the project stands were visited by 100s of KS3 pupils as well as staff and judges.

On the day we were also joined by seven STEM ambassadors, this provided excellent careers links, guidance, and an unbiased supply of judges! As well as displaying their project, the primary students also attended two workshop sessions, 1 making a torch and the other on balanced forces. We could not have run this day without the help and support form a brilliant team of Y10 prefects and Y12 helpers so huge thanks to you guys too.

The day was a huge success and we are looking forward to next year already!

Here are a few student and staff comments;

Thanks so much for doing the science fair, we enjoyed it the whole time! Archie & Hannah – Coldfall Yr6
We loved the day and wish we could do it all over again now! Thandi, Jessica and Max
Thanks you so much for such a fun science day. We had so much fun! – Yr5 teacher
The projects were great, I got to use a robotic arm and make slime. Sam
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25 Genomes online event

The Sanger Institute is celebrating its 25th birthday by sequencing the genomes of 25 species native to the UK.  To mark the occasion, they ran an online event to allow students to vote for 5 of the species whose genomes they will sequence next year.  An application was made and we were lucky enough to be selected to take part and contribute to future science!

Pupils were able to learn about the different species, genetic sequencing and even take part in a live chat with wildlife enthusiasts, who were championing different species in a bid to win votes.  40 different species, which included the Scottish wildcat, the common starfish and the emperor dragonfly, competed against each other.  The leathery sea squirt and lion's mane jellyfish were popular contenders amongst our students.

Well done to the pupils below, who attended biology club and took part in the event.

 Year 9
Liam 9K
Milan 9S
Isadora 9S
Helen 9S 
Megan 9S
Gabriel 9X
Year 10
Zara 10K
Molly 10P
Michelle 10R
Fabiha 10R
Emma 10S
Sasha 10S 
Harry 10S
David 10X
Keshav 10L
Year 11
Grace 11K
Lola 11K
Liliana 11R
Keir 11R
Ella 11R
Alex 11P
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APS Values

Alexandra Park School's Values

Download a PDF of the Values

School is about more than exam results; we educate the whole student.

When we say goodbye to students at the end of their time with us we hope that they are well-rounded individuals, confident about their futures, with the skills to achieve on their chosen paths. To ensure this, we actively teach values and characteristics that we believe will help them during their time at school and later in life.

Resilience is the ability to deal with setbacks and the capacity to push on through difficulties to complete tasks. At school and beyond, this characteristic can be the difference between success and failure. It can be encouraged and must be practised. Those who throw themselves into tasks, without the fear of failure, often gain the most from them. By doing and succeeding, we build our confidence. Sometimes we need to be fearless in order to start a task, particularly something that is new to us: we must have a sense of adventure and the desire to try something challenging.

One of the goals of education is to give students independence so that they can flourish on their own. The first step on this road is to take responsibility for your own learning and, rather than waiting to be shown something, take the initiative and find out for yourself. The best learners show drive; they are independent and motivated, with high ambitions for their work. Longer-term ambitions usually begin with the spark of interest in something. Finding this spark is part of the school experience.

Being organised is more than just remembering what you need to bring to school, planning your time and completing tasks by the due date. It is about having systems of thought that will allow you to structure essay responses and see your way through a task.

We are using the word creativity to mean more than the conventional definition of artistic endeavour. Creativity in finding new ways to accomplish tasks and innovation in finding solutions to difficult problems can differentiate us from our peers. These skills can be developed in all subjects. After the uniformity of the school experience, life is likely to be varied and changing. Being ready and willing to adapt to new situations is a valuable skill.
Whilst learning is a goal in itself we are judged by what we produce. The care, patience, diligence and desire to perfect a piece of work are summed up in a sense of craftsmanship.

Learning new things requires an interest in the world outside of your immediate life. A sense of inquisitiveness and curiosity makes this easier. Whilst some people are naturally curious, others must make an effort. However, it is its own reward. Learning new things opens up new worlds and our curiosity grows.

Whilst being happy may not be as simple as making a decision to be happy, we can find ways to be positive, work out what makes us happy and practise other characteristics that will help us be happy: gratitude, kindness and open-mindedness. Positivity is also about enthusiasm and willingness; a recognition that whilst there may be other things that you would rather be doing right now, you will get the most out of something if you commit to it whole-heartedly. Hard work is much more rewarding if you are enthusiastic about your subject!

Empathy and consideration, the ability to understand the feelings of others and modify our responses with those feelings in mind, are qualities that may not help earn academic grades or get us to university but will be essential to our success in every other aspect of life.

APS Values Reporting

A sample Values report is shown below. All teaching staff contribute to the values report based on observation of each value during class activities and interactions. Individual staff contributions are averaged to create the report you receive.

APS Values Reporting table1

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Student Tracker Report - KS3 Guide

Download a PDF of this guide

Please note that there is a further FQA document in the parent Guides and Reporting section of the website, should you want more information about the reports.

1. Academic Progress Tracking Report:

APS Values GCSE Table

A) Minimum GCSE target grades are based on prior attainment data and are set using the new 9-1 grading system, as all students currently studying in Years 7, 8 and 9 will be sitting only the ‘new’ (reformed) GCSEs.
The diagram on the right illustrates how these new grades relate to the old A*-C / D-G grading system.

 

 

 

B) Progress in relation to these minimum target grades is assessed each term in every subject using the definitions below. Reports will continue to include assessment from previous terms for comparison.
Progress against expectations relates to a student’s individual target, rather than an age-related expectation. A student will be assessed as ‘secure’ if their current performance indicates that they are on track to achieve their GCSE target by the end of Year 11.

KS3 report

C) Attendance and Punctuality are also shown on all reports. The expectation is that students will have no lates and a minimum of 95% attendance.

2. Values Reports

The values report has a broader educational focus, with the intention of developing a range of valuable attributes that will prepare students for life after school. The values are taught in subject areas and via the pastoral system. There are two Values reports per year, in December and July.
All teaching staff contribute to the values report based on observation of each value during class activities and interactions. Individual staff contributions are averaged to create the report you receive.

 

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